Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1965 Jeep J20 Gladiator Build

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    From there, it was test fit, tack, test fit again, score the frame where they should be, remove engine, drop suspension, finish weld the frame mounts on the bench, and finally weld them in place on the frame.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8711.jpg
Views:	265
Size:	1.95 MB
ID:	3033

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8722.jpg
Views:	257
Size:	2.21 MB
ID:	3034

    The 4.0L jeep engine has the mounts offset. They are on the same plane on top of the frame rail even though pic is a bit deceiving.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8713.jpg
Views:	254
Size:	2.70 MB
ID:	3035 ​​

    Comment


    • #47
      Final engine resting location (still shown with suspension fully compressed). I have marked the mounts for a bit more trimming once I have it all apart again for paint and final assembly.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8727.jpg
Views:	263
Size:	2.43 MB
ID:	3037 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8726.jpg
Views:	247
Size:	2.35 MB
ID:	3038 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-8728.jpg
Views:	249
Size:	2.69 MB
ID:	3039


      But for now, it's staying put for the next steps:

      - Mount front wheel and fender to permanently locate cab on frame and mark it. Borrowing the spare from my sister's Jeep as mine have been stuck at a Fastenal DC in GA for 12 days. Really wanted a roller by Thanksgiving
      - Remove cab and install transfer case
      - Finish transmission mount based on transfer case clocking
      - Begin floor deconstruction and reconstruction with new sub structure for JK frame, driver's side drop ATLAS, and Silverado seats... (the fun part!)

      Comment


      • #48
        Good progress. It never goes as fast as we want it to.

        Comment


        • #49
          The wheels eventually arrived so I was able to throw them on and finalize the cab location. They are from a late model Rubicon and I may end up running a 1" spacer but I'll save that for once I have the correct rubber. Here is a pic of them with suspension at full squat on bald 33's. I'm planning to run a 35x10.5 Kenda Kleever RT.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Wheel Preview.jpg
Views:	226
Size:	3.15 MB
ID:	3054

          This also gives you a better idea of the current 116" wheelbase vs the trucks original 120" WB. My options are to either stretch the frame behind the cab which will impact my ability to run a JK stock tank, or shorten the bed in between the wheel wells and front bulkhead. I'm liking the idea of the 116" wheelbase for breakover etc and I have had the thought to split and add 2-3" at the center of the rear fenders anyway so I'm leaning that direction. I always felt the rear wheel arch of the J trucks looked smaller than the front fender openings.

          (you can also see my cheap trick for when I set the cab on the floor on it's back... furniture dollies from Menard's or Harbor Freight make small garage life easier!)

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Wheelbase.jpg
Views:	223
Size:	2.62 MB
ID:	3055


          Comment


          • #50
            Nothing too exciting or innovative here, but the last key to the puzzle of the driveline setting on it's own! Once my brother and sister helped me lift the cab off and roll it aside - I was able to get the ATLAS II mounted. I was dreading the thought of doing it from under the vehicle so while I had them over for the cab, I borrowed their backs for one more activity in lifting it into place! Amazing how much easier it is with help!

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Floor Channels.jpg
Views:	236
Size:	2.99 MB
ID:	3057

            I used the JK cross member and once I had the driveline set at the angle I wanted, I started my cardboard crafts again that Ian Johnson taught me. Made good headway one evening before I had to stop with the loud noises. I had it all set and just needed to cut a few more plates to finish weld but while patting myself on the back, I noticed the engine isolators were shifting hard to the rear. The barrel mounts are great for absorbing side to side and up and down, but don't offer much, if any, thrust resistance. They rely on the transmission mount for that. I failed to double check this as I'm used to basic pad mounts. SO with a little rework, I pushed the driveline forward and fixed my transmission mount.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Transmission Mount Pieces.jpg
Views:	214
Size:	2.42 MB
ID:	3058

            The rear output yoke and rear axle yoke are within .5 degree of each other and the driveshaft appears that it'll be at about a 7 degree operating angle at ride height. In theory this means I won't need a CV on the rear. With the driveline tucked higher (protecting for tons?? ) and a bit offset toward passenger, I will have to open up the arch in the cross member that is under the cab to clear the driveshaft.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Transmission Mount.jpg
Views:	220
Size:	2.93 MB
ID:	3059

            Comment


            • #51
              Next up is tackling the substructure of the floor. My floor is rotten and since I have to rebuild it anyway, I may as well build a newer/better substructure that fits the JK frame and has plenty of meat for the seats with integrated shoulder belt to bolt to.

              It's not often you get 65 degree days during an Indiana December, so I took full advantage and got the pressure washer out. I focused primarily on the trans tunnel as that is about the only thing I'm keeping most of. The majority of that black is old tar undercoating (which is now all over my driveway!) I let it dry out overnight and then put it back in the garage until I could get back to it for demo.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-9498.jpg
Views:	223
Size:	4.18 MB
ID:	3061 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-9501.jpg
Views:	208
Size:	2.84 MB
ID:	3062

              The plan is pretty straight forward; Replace the two main stamped floor channels that aligned with the contours of the J200 frame, with two new 2x3" tubes that align with the JK frame mounts. I am using the factory front and rear cross structures from the inner rocker to tie into the tubing but the centers were rotten so I'll replace them with 2x3" tube as well. The inner rockers needed repaired at the mid mount on each side so I used a thicker metal so it could tolerate a larger drain opening to prevent it from rotting again.

              I've left as much of the floor in there for now as I can for stability until I get both sides. I'll likely weld a temporary cross brace between the two channels so I can cut the rest of the floor (minus tunnel) and set it back on the frame to build out the pan structure around the t-case and seat brackets. I've got 1x2" tubing to build floor pan and seat supports off of the 2x3" channels.

              My Sawzall sh*t the bed as I was starting the other side so have to get back to it next time!

              Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-9635.jpg
Views:	210
Size:	2.92 MB
ID:	3063

              Comment


              • #52
                Oh hey there! Sorry it's been a while. Crazy times with end of year and holidays but been been getting a few hours in here and there when I can. The floor structure of the cab was definitely the most daunting for a one man show in tight quarters given the amount of times I was going to have to remove the cab and set it on it's back and then back on the chassis etc. My cherry picker has paid itself off several times on this job (and it was only about $50 from Craigslist 10 years ago!).

                Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 10.48.59 PM.png
Views:	137
Size:	5.92 MB
ID:	3071 Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 10.49.35 PM.png
Views:	132
Size:	5.46 MB
ID:	3072

                Once I had the 2x3" tubing channels welded in and the center section of the inner rockers repaired, it was time to weld in a temporary cross piece for stability and cut the rest of the flooring out that I wouldn't be reusing. I needed to reshape the tunnel to clear the new bucket seats and the new driveline is driver's side drop so the tunnel could be slimmed down to give the passenger more floor space. I left a small section of the original floor channel on the firewall since it wasn't going to be in the way and could keep some stability. I had to collapse the bottom of it to clear the JK frame where the frame starts to go upward for front axle clearance.

                Now that I have floor channels that align with the JK body mounts, I positioned the cab on the JK frame and measured about 50 times from 6 key points to make sure it was exactly where I wanted it to end up. I marked through the JK body mounts onto the new channels, removed the cab and set it on it's back AGAIN and drilled the 4 body mount holes all the way through the channels. I opened up the holes on the interior side of the channel with a stepper bit large enough to drop a 1/2" thread coupling nut into the tubing. I set the cab back on the frame and threaded bolts through the JK mounts to locate and secure the coupling nuts while I welded them from the top. Now to remove the cab, I was able to remove the body mount bolts and screw in 1/2" thread eye bolts into the top of the coupling nuts for MUCH easier lifting.

                Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 10.53.49 PM.png
Views:	134
Size:	4.66 MB
ID:	3073

                Cab back on it's back so I could finish weld the coupling nuts on the bottom and then cab back onto the chassis and bolted into place - firmly!! I know it'll come back off several times but feels good to have it secured to the frame. I'm very happy with the end result of going this route. Will always be easy to thread the eye bolts into the floor if I need to remove cab with cherry picker or if I have a 2-post lift one day I can now lift the cab from the channels underneath.

                Comment


                • #53
                  With the cab back on the frame and bolted down, next step in finishing the floor of the cab is to build the sub framework for the GM seats. Given the seatbelts are integrated into the seats, I wanted to make sure they were secured into more than just floor pans.

                  I loosely installed the dash and steering column so that I could center the driver's seat. Using 1x2" tubing, I built a frame and welded it to the 2x3 floor channels. I arched over the rear driveshaft to connect the driver and passenger seat structure and will potentially add another cross channel behind that of 2x3 aligned with the B pillar.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 11.10.24 PM.png
Views:	153
Size:	4.96 MB
ID:	3075

                  I'll upload pics once I have the seats out again but to secure the seats to the substructure, I drilled holes and dropped in 7/16" flange nuts welding them in place.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 11.10.50 PM.png
Views:	140
Size:	4.61 MB
ID:	3076

                  This is a very exciting milestone recharging me a bit. I can sit in my truck and pretend I'm driving! While i have the interior bits in place, I'm going to go ahead and modify the transmission shifter and ATLAS twin-sticks.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 11.15.53 PM.png
Views:	144
Size:	2.80 MB
ID:	3078

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2022-01-23 at 11.11.26 PM.png
Views:	141
Size:	3.34 MB
ID:	3077

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Looking Good Steve. I like the fact you have used RHS to upgrade the floor not just replace the tin.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Nick Ball OZ View Post
                      Looking Good Steve. I like the fact you have used RHS to upgrade the floor not just replace the tin.
                      Thank you! Definitely feels sturdy to have seats not reliant on sheet metal for mounting! Hoping to tackle the shifters and or dog house this weekend. Need to mount accelerator pedal and adapt my brake booster and clutch master linkages to original pedals.

                      Waiting on my two front body mounts to arrive to finish the fab work on the radiator support. Once I have that all located, I can measure to see if another idea for a cooling package I have will work.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Radiator support mounts are supposed to arrive today so I wanted to be ready. I got the dog house torn down (thanks to my wife for helping me remove the hood!) and did a quick fit check of the radiator support to see how much room I am working with for a cooling package/fan before I hit the engine. On my Land Rover, it's 6" from face of radiator core to the fan hub. Tight like a tiger. On the J truck, it's going to be between 10-12" which is awesome!

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1404.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	4.04 MB
ID:	3100

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          My cooling package idea is to keep it simple. Use as many OEM parts as I can in an engineered solution by people smarter than I! So, I ran down to the Jeep dealership and worked through some parts schematics and PN's with the parts counter (big thanks for them taking the time!) and then out to the lot with a measuring tape to pop the hood of a brand new JL with a 3.0L EcoDiesel.

                          The plan is to order a JL radiator (same for all engine options), JL 3.0 charge cooler, JL AC condenser, and the JL cooling fan. They all bolt together and the mounting plane on the JL's radiator support is conveniently flat. I was thinking I would order a JL radiator support and adapt it but I don't think that's necessary if I can get my radiator support flat. Knowing I needed to move the body mounts on the radiator support anyway to adapt it to the JK frame, I could confidently remove the ol' Jeeps radiator support mounts to give me that flat surface.

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1435.jpg
Views:	77
Size:	3.78 MB
ID:	3104

                          This also allowed me to open the stock '65 offset opening for the old Tornado engine radiator to make the radiator opening as big as possible and symmetrical so that air can get access every inch of the radiator core.

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1437.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	3.38 MB
ID:	3102 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1439.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	4.07 MB
ID:	3105 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1440.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	4.15 MB
ID:	3103

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            I did have to trim the bottom of the grill support a bit for the JK frame horns. This is the only visible body modification for the JK frame swap on the outside of the truck. Most of this will be behind the factory bumper but I am thinking I still want to integrate the JK factory tow hooks here in this spot that so will help hide whatever is still visible. (I'm also protecting for a hidden winch down the road that will be integrated into the factory bumper.).

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1441.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	3.24 MB
ID:	3107 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1446.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	3.90 MB
ID:	3108 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1444.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	4.22 MB
ID:	3109

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              My hat's off to you. I've haven't got brave enough yet to dig that far into the body work. That's a whole other discipline.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                I've made progress on the pedal assemblies which are now nearly complete! First up was to make a bracket for the Cummins provided throttle pedal. When I chose the WM530 pedal for our kit, it was because I felt it had versatility/durability for these 4x4 applications. You can remove and modify the mounting bracket or even modify the pedal pad rod. I went out to my Disco II to measure my spacing from the brake pedal and floor where I had mounted it for that swap so I could match those ergonomics on the Jeep. I temporarily installed the Jeep's brake pedal assembly and I set the throttle pedal up to have 2" gap from brake pedal and 3" off the floorboard. The throttle pedal should also be set forward (toward firewall) of the brake pedal for safety.

                                Back to arts and crafts, I used some cardboard from a box of donuts to trace the shape/contour/holes of the right side of the steering shaft mounting plate on the firewall. I then cut my metal using that template, bent it, bolted it up, and held the pedal in place to measure how much I needed to cut off of the pedal's bracket. Once I had that, I tacked it, took it off, and finish welded it.

                                Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1744.jpg
Views:	53
Size:	3.79 MB
ID:	3192 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1747.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	3.09 MB
ID:	3194 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1748.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	3.91 MB
ID:	3193 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1753.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	3.82 MB
ID:	3195 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1759.jpg
Views:	40
Size:	4.27 MB
ID:	3196

                                Tip: One thing to make sure of is that you leave yourself enough clearance that the throttle sensor can get to 100% without hitting the floorboard or firewall. This is critical for the MAF auto calibration. Factor in floor mat thickness as well.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X